Internalised stigma

A friend has told me he met a really fantastic girl. She’s everything he dreamed of. They’ve been dating non-committally for a few months, and now he asked her to be his girlfriend. Her response? “I can’t be anybody’s girlfriend,” she said. “I have bipolar disorder, and it’s a terrible illness. I’m just not fit to have a relationship, any relationship at all.” He asked me how he could convince her. “You’ve got bipolar,” he said, “and you’re in a relationship. It’s possible to have a relationship while having bipolar, right?”

Of course it is. But then the problem with bipolar disorder is that it doesn’t actually make anything impossible. You can be a respected professor of psychiatry like Kay Redfield Jamison. You can be a super-popular actor and TV personality like Stephen Fry. You can be a chart-topping singer like Robbie Williams. You can be married, have kids, a good job. It’s just that for us it’s harder than for “normies”, and some of us overestimate the difficulty level based on what we heard and read about ourselves. And this is where internalised stigma comes in.

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